Roger Williams University

Summer/Fall 2003

SUMMER

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Man and His Technology
Course Number: IT 110

Credits: 3
Instructor: Warren

Involves a review of the literature dealing with futuristic trends and projections for our technological society and their implications for future developments.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Manufacturing Processes I
Course Number: IT 119

Credits: 3
Instructor: Lacontora

Study of materials, processes, and equipment used in industry today. Topics include ferrous and nonferrous metals, material testing, heat treatment, founding process output capabilities of machines, welding, and inspection. Field trips and industrial films augment the text material.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Manufacturing Processes II
Course Number: IT 219
Credits: 3
Instructor: Lacontora

(Prerequisite: IT 119 or consent of instructor) A continuation of Manufacturing Processes I. Includes the economics of metal cutting, production machines, abrasives, grinding operation, ultrafinishing, automation, and numerical control.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Time and Motion Study
Course Number: IT 452
Credits: 3
Instructor: Miller

(Prerequisite: Junior standing) Explores principles of applications of motion analysis, process study, operation study, micro motion study, methods improvement, work simplification, standardization, rating, allowances, analysis of time data.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Facilities Planning and Design
Course Number: IT 474
Credits: 3
Instructor: Miller

(Prerequisite: Junior standing) Introduces the types of plant layout and the factors influencing plant layout and design, selection and design of processes and machines, material handling systems, flow diagrams, evaluating alternative layouts, and installing the layout.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title:
Public Administration
Course Number: PA 201
Credits: 3
Instructor: Esons

Introduces the theory, forms, and practice of public administration at the national, subnational, and international levels. Emphasizes administrative theories, concepts of bureaucracy, the environment of public service, and the role of administrators in government.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title:
State and Local Government
Course Number: PA 305
Credits: 3
Instructor: Belair

(Prerequisite: POLSC 100 or PA 201 or PA 202 or consent of instructor) Analysis of state and local governments with emphasis on the distribution of political power and administrative responsibility in selected public programs and areas of public policy.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title:
City Management
Course Number: PA 306
Credits: 3
Instructor: Belair

Personnel and labor relations, municipal services, and political and public relations; analysis of city governments and the role of city and local government managers; examination of the planning, policy, management, evaluation, and financial dimensions of cities.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title:
Public Policy
Course Number: PA 340
Credits: 3
Instructor: Belair

(Prerequisite: POLSC 100 or PA 201 or PA 202 or consent of instructor) Systematic analysis of critical domestic issues and areas: poverty, race relations, crime, etc. Consideration of the entire public policy cycle: recognition and definition of potential "problems"; formulation and implementation of governmental policy solutions; and assessment of the impact of policies.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title: Public Personnel Administration
Course Number: PA 362
Credits: 3
Instructor: Asquino

(Prerequisite: POLSC 100 or PA 201 or PA 202 or consent of instructor) Focuses on the primary personnel functions including job evaluation and compensation; staffing; employee training and development; employee relations; collective bargaining; and other issues and concerns of public sector personnel management.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title: Public Financial Administration
Course Number: PA 363
Credits: 3
Instructor: Asquino

Prerequisite: POLSC 100 or PA 201 or PA 202 or consent of instructor) This course explores administrative, political, and institutional aspects of the budgetary and financial management processes within the public sector. A review of federal, state, and local financial, budget, and revenue systems.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number: CJS 105
Credits: 2
Instructor: O'Donnell

An overview of the American criminal justice system. Discusses in detail the individual components of the criminal justice system, including the police, the courts, and the corrections system. Designed not only to provide basic understanding of our legal system, but also to provoke thinking on key legal and criminal justice issues such as the death penalty and mandatory sentencing laws.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Policing of America
Course Number: CJS 150
Credits: 3
Instructor: Mazzi

Review of the history of policing and police functioning with regard to contemporary social issues. Special focus on related research into police functioning.

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Substantive Criminal Justice
Course Number: CJS 201
Credits: 3
Instructor: Notte

(Prerequisite: CJS 105) An introductory analysis of substantive criminal law, emphasizing common law and modern statutory applications of criminal law. Course topics include the nature of substantive law, the distinction between the criminal and civil justice systems, the elements of crimes, and the essential components of crimes including wrongful criminal acts (actus reus), criminal intent (mens rea), causation and harm. This course also considers the insanity defense, entrapment and several other defenses to crimes that are used in the U.S. legal system.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Police Community Relations
Course Number: CJS 212
Credits: 3
Instructor: Goodwin

(Prerequisite: CJS 150; SOC 100 recommended) An analysis of the theory, procedures and practices associated with the police functions of service, maintenance of order, and crime reduction within the community. Topics include police role, concepts in changing a society, police discretion, and community relations in the context of our changing culture.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Drugs, Society, and Behavior
Course Number: CJS 305
Credits: 3
Instructor: Scorobogaty

(Prerequisite: CJS 150; SOC 100 and BIOL 103 recommended) Issues related to the use and abuse of drugs in American society. Topics include effects of drugs on the human nervous system; addictions and their treatments; legalization; the social and political meanings of abuse, addiction, rehabilitation; and education/prevention methodologies.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Courts & Criminal Justice
Course Number: CJS 320
Credits: 3
Instructor: Higgins

(Prerequisite: CJS 105) Survey of court administration: its beginning, development, and present status. Comparative study of federal and state systems with emphasis on Rhode Island. Concentrates on the role of the courts and their administration in the criminal justice system including their relationship to judges, the public, the bar, and police and correctional agencies. Discussion includes specific problem areas such as finance, personnel management, statistical information and data processing, records management, case scheduling, and interagency relationships.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Corrections in the United States
Course Number: CJS 330
Credits: 3
Instructor: McKenna

(Prerequisite: CJS 105; or consent of instructor) Current correctional thought and practices in the United States, the evolution of modern correctional practices in the United States, and an overview of correctional treatment in different types of institutions and in the community.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Community Based Corrections
Course Number: CJS 332
Credits: 3
Instructor: McKenna

(Prerequisite: CJS 330) Addresses the origins, features, and problems associated with probation and parole as background to the presentation of model programs. Topics include investigation and classification of participants; community protection rehabilitation; rules of supervision; and the benefits and drawbacks of these systems; intermediate interdiction programs, including intensive supervision, electronic monitoring, community service systems, and shock incarceration projects.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Juvenile Justice
Course Number: CJS 403
Credits: 3
Instructor: Gontarz

(Prerequisites: CJS 105, CJS 308; CJS 320 recommended) Addresses problems and issues pertaining to youth offenders and how they are processed by the police, courts, and corrections. Features the interrelatedness of theory, policies and practices, as well as assessment of their long-range impact on procedures. Focuses on the intake and court process; nominal and conditional sanctions to include community-based intervention; diversion; probation; and custodial sanctions through juvenile correctional systems.

 

FALL

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Man and His Technology
Course Number: IT 110

Credits: 3
Instructor: Warren

Involves a review of the literature dealing with futuristic trends and projections for our technological society and their implications for future developments.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Studies in Technology
Course Number: IT 110

Credits: 3
Instructor: Swiczewicz

An investigation into the common developmental and organizational factors in an industrial enterprise: corporate and managerial structure, product development and production analysis, labor and job training considerations. A corporation is created, industrial positions are role-played, a product is developed, produced and sold, and the enterprise is analyzed for production problems, overhead, and profit.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Time and Motion Study
Course Number: IT 452
Credits: 3
Instructor: Miller

(Prerequisite: Junior standing) Explores principles of applications of motion analysis, process study, operation study, micro motion study, methods improvement, work simplification, standardization, rating, allowances, analysis of time data.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Production Planning
Course Number: IT 455
Credits: 3
Instructor: Lacontora

(Prerequisite: Senior standing) Examines the fundamentals of production such as analysis, planning and control, organization of production, forecasting and master production schedules, procurement, stock of production, stock control, routing, scheduling and dispatching, and quantitative methods.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Workplace Safety and Health
Course Number: IT 457

Credits: 3
Instructor: Swiczewicz

(Prerequisite: Junior standing)
Topics include: job safety analysis, plant inspection, accident investigation, safety education, and training. Special emphasis is placed on an introduction to the OSHA program and its application to industry.

 

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Quality Control
Course Number: IT 458

Credits: 3
Instructor: Swiczewicz

(Prerequisite: MATH 225 or MATH 315)
Stresses applications of statistical theory with emphasis on developing a wide range of analytical techniques. Objective is to provide an understanding of the increasing value of quality control in the business and industrial community.

Discipline: Industrial Technology
Title:
Facilities Planning and Design
Course Number: IT 474
Credits: 3
Instructor: Miller

(Prerequisite: Junior standing) Introduces the types of plant layout and the factors influencing plant layout and design, selection and design of processes and machines, material handling systems, flow diagrams, evaluating alternative layouts, and installing the layout.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title:
Public Administration
Course Number: PA 201
Credits: 3
Instructor: Stout

Introduces the theory, forms, and practice of public administration at the national, subnational, and international levels. Emphasizes administrative theories, concepts of bureaucracy, the environment of public service, and the role of administrators in government.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title:
State and Local Government
Course Number: PA 305
Credits: 3
Instructor: Belair

(Prerequisite: POLSC 100 or PA 201 or PA 202 or consent of instructor) Analysis of state and local governments with emphasis on the distribution of political power and administrative responsibility in selected public programs and areas of public policy.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title:
City Management
Course Number: PA 306
Credits: 3
Instructor: Belair

Personnel and labor relations, municipal services, and political and public relations; analysis of city governments and the role of city and local government managers; examination of the planning, policy, management, evaluation, and financial dimensions of cities.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title:
Public Policy
Course Number: PA 340
Credits: 3
Instructor: Belair

(Prerequisite: POLSC 100 or PA 201 or PA 202 or consent of instructor) Systematic analysis of critical domestic issues and areas: poverty, race relations, crime, etc. Consideration of the entire public policy cycle: recognition and definition of potential "problems"; formulation and implementation of governmental policy solutions; and assessment of the impact of policies.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title: Public Personnel Administration
Course Number: PA 362
Credits: 3
Instructor: Asquino

(Prerequisite: POLSC 100 or PA 201 or PA 202 or consent of instructor) Focuses on the primary personnel functions including job evaluation and compensation; staffing; employee training and development; employee relations; collective bargaining; and other issues and concerns of public sector personnel management.

 

Discipline: Political Science
Title: Public Financial Administration
Course Number: PA 363
Credits: 3
Instructor: Asquino

Prerequisite: POLSC 100 or PA 201 or PA 202 or consent of instructor) This course explores administrative, political, and institutional aspects of the budgetary and financial management processes within the public sector. A review of federal, state, and local financial, budget, and revenue systems.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number: CJS 105
Credits: 2
Instructor: O'Donnell

An overview of the American criminal justice system. Discusses in detail the individual components of the criminal justice system, including the police, the courts, and the corrections system. Designed not only to provide basic understanding of our legal system, but also to provoke thinking on key legal and criminal justice issues such as the death penalty and mandatory sentencing laws.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Policing of America
Course Number: CJS 150
Credits: 3
Instructor: Mazzi

Review of the history of policing and police functioning with regard to contemporary social issues. Special focus on related research into police functioning.

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Substantive Criminal Justice
Course Number: CJS 201
Credits: 3
Instructor: Notte

(Prerequisite: CJS 105) An introductory analysis of substantive criminal law, emphasizing common law and modern statutory applications of criminal law. Course topics include the nature of substantive law, the distinction between the criminal and civil justice systems, the elements of crimes, and the essential components of crimes including wrongful criminal acts (actus reus), criminal intent (mens rea), causation and harm. This course also considers the insanity defense, entrapment and several other defenses to crimes that are used in the U.S. legal system.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Police Community Relations
Course Number: CJS 212
Credits: 3
Instructor: Goodwin

(Prerequisite: CJS 150; SOC 100 recommended) An analysis of the theory, procedures and practices associated with the police functions of service, maintenance of order, and crime reduction within the community. Topics include police role, concepts in changing a society, police discretion, and community relations in the context of our changing culture.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Drugs, Society, and Behavior
Course Number: CJS 305
Credits: 3
Instructor: Scorobogaty

(Prerequisite: CJS 150; SOC 100 and BIOL 103 recommended) Issues related to the use and abuse of drugs in American society. Topics include effects of drugs on the human nervous system; addictions and their treatments; legalization; the social and political meanings of abuse, addiction, rehabilitation; and education/prevention methodologies.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Criminology
Course Number: CJS 308
Credits: 3
Instructor: Procaccini

Prerequisites: CJS 105 and SOC 100; or consent of instructor) Examines classical and contemporary criminological theories, their historical development and empirical basis, as well as their significance to the criminal justice process and the rehabilitation, deterrence, processing, and punishment of offenders.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Courts & Criminal Justice
Course Number: CJS 320
Credits: 3
Instructor: Higgins

(Prerequisite: CJS 105) Survey of court administration: its beginning, development, and present status. Comparative study of federal and state systems with emphasis on Rhode Island. Concentrates on the role of the courts and their administration in the criminal justice system including their relationship to judges, the public, the bar, and police and correctional agencies. Discussion includes specific problem areas such as finance, personnel management, statistical information and data processing, records management, case scheduling, and interagency relationships.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Corrections in the United States
Course Number: CJS 330
Credits: 3
Instructor: McKenna

(Prerequisite: CJS 105; or consent of instructor) Current correctional thought and practices in the United States, the evolution of modern correctional practices in the United States, and an overview of correctional treatment in different types of institutions and in the community.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Community Based Corrections
Course Number: CJS 332
Credits: 3
Instructor: McKenna

(Prerequisite: CJS 330) Addresses the origins, features, and problems associated with probation and parole as background to the presentation of model programs. Topics include investigation and classification of participants; community protection rehabilitation; rules of supervision; and the benefits and drawbacks of these systems; intermediate interdiction programs, including intensive supervision, electronic monitoring, community service systems, and shock incarceration projects.

 

Discipline: Criminal Justice
Title: Survey of Methods in Criminal Justice
Course Number: CJS 359
Credits: 3
Instructor: Esons

This course is an introduction to the methodology, design, and research techniques used in the fields of criminal justice and criminology. Course topics include sampling, research designs, ethical considerations in research, survey construction, interviewing and proposal writing.

 

 

To register for above courses visit Roger Williams University Admissons Office


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